I believe that Shure produced high impedance elements through the 80’s here in the US, but they were not the elements being used in the green bullet mics. Check it out in the pictures section along with my very rare small shell, all brushed nickel 1949 model 520, and examples of all the mics and elements mentioned on this website. They are much lower in gain and not as gritty either. They were all very thin sounding, no bottom to speak of, and weak to top it off. One sheet with a date of 1959 would have the freq. DO NOT look to buy elements on ebay unless you’re prepared to pay 100 times more than you can get one for elsewhere. The latest version of the infamous green bullet mic is the model 520DX. Find answers at our, About The tricky part of this code system is that it went for 20 years using the first 20 letters of the alphabet. A common low impedance model is the 99C86 which is a 15 ohm model. NEVER clean a magnetic element with steel wool, and if you use it to prepare a shell for painting, make sure that you remove the element from the shell and store it in a zip lock plastic bag or something to prevent it from coming into contact with the metal dust from the steel wool. These metal pieces were sometimes not perfectly aligned, and would cause the gap in the armature assembly to be inconsistent from one element to another, which is another reason why the early models were more inconsistent in tone as compared to the later models. The first digit is the year of manufacture, and the last two digits are the week of the year that they were made. Needless to say, they are very rare to find these days. There is a way to get some hints though. I believe it was sometime in the early 50’s that Shure changed the shape and the model # of the crystal element. I believe it was in 1951 that Shure began using a 3 digit date code. coverage. If it fails for the same defect 3 times, it is Known as the "Green Bullet", it features a volume control knob and its base allows the user to make adjustments to suit their needs during live performances. These dynamic elements turn mechanical vibrations into electrical signals, where as a speaker turns the electrical signals into mechanical vibrations. These CR and CM elements were used in many different types of microphones. Over the years, Shure used many different model numbers on the CR and CM elements which were used in many different types of microphones for other companies as well as their own. You can see it glued to the center of the diaphram of all CR elements. The F, K, and X are really not common models, but I have seen a few, mostly in older model mics of various types. Subscriptions, CA All the vintage elements have a metal foil diaphram, and a magnetic assembly that consists of two L shaped pieces of metal to hold the permanent magnet in place. One spec sheet may say that the elements had a freq. For example, some are brighter sounding, some are stronger in the mids, or some may have a better bass response than others. See terms and There is an obvious difference in appearance of the cloth like labels as compared to the glossy type. response of 100 to 7,000Hz, and others that say the same model 520 had a freq. Download PDF Thats right, $2.75, not $275. In my opinion, all of them! I think they were a better harp mic than the 520DX by a long shot! I, and many many others were very disappointed in the quality of those crystals. Submit a ticket directly to Shure Customer Service staff, or reach out via phone or email. Many of the early models used a glue that these days has become brittle, and has caused the disc to loose contact with the foil diaphram causing the element to sound weak, or dull. The wire winding and the magnetic field created by the magnet turn the vibrations from the diaphram into electrical impulses that are then sent to an amplifier via the mic cable. Another thing that I’ve heard people say is that the higher the resistance reading is, the more gain, or hotter the element will be. Nobody in the right mind would hoard these things and pay $200+ for each one. Over the years, Shure used a few different types of tags on the shells. The 707A. These days Shure 520DX Green Bullet Harmonica Mic is the most popular microphones used by Blues players today. ET usually ship the same business day. The elements that came in the 707A in the 40’s were model #99-131. While it is true with certain microphones, a small difference in resistance with CR and CM elements is not going to make an element stronger or weaker than another. These mic’s are OK for harmonica, but they do not have the same sound that you will get from a 520 green bullet. Low impedance models were rated at 71.5db below 1 volt per microbar (open circuit voltage). the latest deals. Some of the very first models used a magnet hold down assembly that consisted of four pieces of metal that all must be kept precisely in place as opposed to the two piece magnet holders used later on. Trying to find one today could put you into debt if you get carried away trying to find the ultimate element! These mic’s are OK for harmonica, but they do not have the same sound that you will get from a 520 green bullet. In 1954 Shure switched to a plastic bobbin which remained the type used until the elements were discontinued in the early 90’s. I do also have a CM element with the same wiring construction as the CR’s that has a date code of 827, which means that it was about this time (July 1958), that the elements began being labeled as Controlled Magnetic Transducers. I’ll pass along any other clues and info as I get them, or change any dates that I find out may be wrong, but everything here is fairly accurate as far as I know. I can’t remember all the model #’s I’ve seen over the years but here’s a list of the more commonly seen models. I did eventually find a primo condition working 9822B which has fantastic tone and about as fat a low end as you’ll ever hear from a crystal mic. The 520DX does not seem to have as much high end as the vintage models, and they all seem to be pretty consistent in tone. This is nonsense! An attached cable with a standard 1/4-inch plug allows the microphone to be connected to a high-impedance device. These few people who are paying upwards of $200 and sometimes as much as $300 for mic’s with CR’s in them are apparently so greedy that they won’t let one or two pass by. Signature, distinct lo-fi sound. to guide you through your entire shopping experience. The “R5” is just the replacement model # that Shure used for the earlier mic models, just as an “R7” was replacement model # for the 707A mic crystal elements. Gold Coverage goes above and beyond the manufacturer's warranty to protect your gear from unexpected These mics had the biggest, fattest tone you’ll ever hear from a harp mic although it wasn’t made to be a harp specific microphone. Shure also produced a couple other bullet style mics back in the late 30’s early 40’s which were the model 7A, and a moving coil dynamic microphone that was made in 1939 only. For the most part, the MC151’s, which were discontinued in the late 90’s, had a tone that many describe as “tinny”. There is also a smaller version of the controlled magnetic transducer that Shure used in the model 430 Commando microphone. If you’re still having trouble trying to figure out the year your element was made, there are some other clues such as the tags used on the shells that may help, but this information should help you determine exactly when your mic or element was made. The Shure 520DX Green Bullet has an instantly recognisable sound …

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